Telecom


India's telecommunication network is the second largest in the world by number of telephone users (both fixed and mobile phone) with 1.053 billion subscribers as on 31 August 2016. It has one of the lowest call tariffs in the world enabled by mega telecom operators and hyper-competition among them. India has the world's second-largest Internet user-base. As on 31 March 2016, there were 342.65 million internet subscribers in the country. Indian telecom industry underwent a high pace of market liberalisation and growth since the 1990s and now has become the world's most competitive and one of the fastest growing telecom markets.

The Industry has grown over twenty times in just ten years, from under 37 million subscribers in the year 2001 to over 846 million subscribers in the year 2011.

Telecommunication has supported the socioeconomic development of India and has played a significant role to narrow down the rural-urban digital divide to some extent.

The rapid strides in the telecom sector have been facilitated by liberal policies of the Government that provides easy market access for telecom equipment and a fair regulatory framework for offering telecom services to the Indian consumers at affordable prices.

The exponential growth witnessed by the telecom sector in the past decade has led to the development of the telecom equipment manufacturing and other supporting industries. With the advent of next-generation technologies and 3G and Broadband Wireless Access Services rolled out by operators, the demand for telecom equipment has increased. In an attempt to capitalize on this opportunity, the government and policymakers are focusing on developing the domestic manufacturing industry. The Indian equipment manufacturing sector has come a long way in the past few years. From being an import-centric industry, it is slowly but steadily moving towards becoming a global telecom equipment manufacturing hub.

The government is offering various sops to industry to boost domestic manufacturing in the field of electronics. According to a report by leading research firm Market Research Store, the Indian telecommunication services market will likely grow by 10.3 per cent year-on-year to reach US$ 103.9 billion by 2020.

Today's service providers are confronted by radical changes to their business environment, and while they have been largely working to create leaner operations, the mechanics of doing business has changed over the years leading to transformations in the business model. CSPs are fast transforming themselves from a legacy communication service provider to an IP broadband, cloud and IT platform provider with greater focus on a business segment. The traditional services would now contribute to roughly 38% of the total business and the focus would be more on the next gen services which would include hi-speed internet, wireless, OTT/IPTV, IoT, hosted VoIP among others. Every wave of innovation gives opportunities to rebalance strategies. The CSPs should adopt a four pronged strategy to regain the market position.


Costs QOS/QOE Revenue Churn

'Born Digital' telecom organizations are not restricted by legacy technology and business process, and are disrupting traditional business models through innovations in customer experience and engagement, service management and delivery, and product structure. On the other hand, traditional Telecommunication Services Providers - given the complexity of their estates - are finding it difficult to make the tectonic shift because not all of them are invested across the maturity curve to improve their connectedness with the business ecosystem. Talent Sketchers's end-to-end solutions framework is a comprehensive approach to increase efficiency, drive cost reductions and foster innovation.